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  • Temple Beth Shalom
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A GREAT TIME WAS HAD BY ALL!

In the words of our new WRJ Central District president, Sandy Adland, there is nothing like “Audacious Hospitality!”

Thanks to everyone who played a part in planning and orchestrating Sisterhood’s First Annual “Paid Member” luncheon last Sunday.

Over twenty sistas were treated to a delicious and delectable buffet luncheon featuring gourmet chicken, pasta with cream sauce, mixed green salad, fresh fruit and a mouth-watering selection of New York-style cheesecake.

With Sisterhood, it’s not only “all about the food,” but it’s also about inspiring programming.

Lisa Singer provided an update on WRJ activities, including the YES FUND and the Uniongram project. She explained that fund raising is crucial to supporting and enhancing the goals of both WRJ and Sisterhood.

We also extend our thanks and appreciation to Rebecca Egolf for serving as our luncheon speaker. Using a creative and unique format of pre-written questions, the sistas were provided with “inside information” about Rebecca’s background, academic pursuits, family history, favorite leisure time passions and pursuits... and perhaps the biggest curiosity: how she met her husband, Rabbi Jim Egolf!

Following that, Rebecca led us in an exercise of creating a “spider’s web” out of a ball of yarn. Standing in a circle, the sistas passed the yarn from side to side... all the while creating a “web.”

Rebecca then shared the analogy of the spider’s web being a metaphor for sharing and supporting one another within Sisterhood, within our circle of family and friends, as well as within our communities.

Thanks again to everyone who helped make this event fun and memorable!

Sisterhood Book Club... With a Twist

Please note that our upcoming Sisterhood Book Club, scheduled for Thursday, December 4th, in the TBS Social Hall has been “upgraded” to include a POT LUCK DINNER, starting at 6:30 p.m.

Discussion of author Irv Korman’s book, “I was Jerry Lewis’ Bodyguard for 10 Minutes!” will begin at 7:00 p.m.

Weather-permitting, Irv will be joining us for the discussion.

Please contact Lisa Singer at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or call her at 330-241-9612 to reserve your spot.

In addition to a covered dish (appetizer, entrée, side dish or dessert), a favorite bottle of wine to share would also be appreciated!

In case of inclement weather... resulting in Hudson issuing a snow parking ban... attendees will be contacted and the gathering will be canceled.

We’ve heard from several sistas that they’re enjoying this book. Hope to see you there!

The Annual Frying of the Latkes

Sistas! Get ready for our most sizzling event of the year! Our Annual Frying of the Latkes will take place at TBS on Sunday, December 14th, starting at 9:00 a.m.

Come dressed in your “non-finest” and join us for this time-honored event!

Don’t miss out on this special day of frying and fun! Whether you want to volunteer to work a shift or stay for the day, Lisa Singer would love to hear from you! (See contact information above).

Any donations of heavy-duty tin foil and large zip-lock baggies would be appreciated. Also, those sistas who can loan food processors, cooling racks, large mixing bowls, etc. please let Lisa know as well.

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD ORDER FORMS FOR PURCHASING LATKES FROM THE TEMPLE BETH SHALOM WEBSITE.

Please note that all proceeds from the sale of the latkes go towards supporting Temple Beth Shalom and Sisterhood.

Yours in Sisterhood,
Emily Audra Fleisher

Hello Temple Members,

Recently Wendy Hess, Stefani Carlson, Rabbi Egolf and I went to a community-wide Yom Iyyun (Day of Learning) with Dr. Ron Wolfson. Dr. Wolfson gave us a preview of his new book, Relational Judaism Using the Power of Relationships to Transform The Jewish Community. We studied the text and watched a video about the importance of welcoming guests. We will be available to discuss what we learned with the board or anyone who is interested. Our little synagogue naturally already does some of the things he is suggesting synagogues start doing when we introduce ourselves to newcomers and try to include them into our groups. One thing he mentioned was we need to increase the level of volunteerism by not making volunteers feel overwhelmed in giving them too much to do. We are actively seeking additional volunteers so that we can keep the work load manageable for all. Please contact any board member or myself about possible volunteer opportunities.

Thank you very much,
Elisa Greta

When I was 17 years old, I went to Jewish summer camp. That summer there was an ambitious program of Judaic study at camp. We each received a copy of The Torah-A Modern Commentary recently edited by Gunther Plaut (tz”l) and we were going to study … Torah. Whether we were in the youngest unit, or the oldest staff member, we each received a copy of this tome with our names printed in gold on the front. This was the summer I got my first Torah commentary and it was the summer I decided I wanted to become a rabbi.

I still have my copy of the Torah from that summer. Scribbled in pencil in and around the margins of my commentary are notes, questions and insights I found from that time forward. It did not matter that I could not read the Hebrew (at that time) nor that I had never studied Bible in a college class, it was a matter that I read the stories of the Torah and asked the question, ‘why does my tradition want me to read these words?’ While my skills in Hebrew and pulling apart a text have increased since that time, I have never fully answered my question, ‘why does my tradition want me to read these words?’

I want to invite you to begin our search for an answer to this question this Saturday morning as we take out our Torah commentaries and study Torah. We’ll start at 9:30am and study on the Saturday mornings following every weekend with a Shabbat evening service. I can’t tell you that we will ever find an answer to my question; I can tell you that we will join together and work to find what we feel God is trying to say to us.

To me Torah is more than a book or scroll; it is the basis of the conversation that binds Jewish communities together. Whether it is today in the 21st century, or with Jews 2,000 years ago, it is this text that was and remains the centering conversation of our sacred community.

Join Us.

Rabbi Jim

Temple Beth Shalom Religious School, in partnership with the Retreat Institute of the Jewish Education Center of Cleveland, invites all TBS members to attend our first-ever overnight family education retreat, to be held MLK Weekend, January 17-18, 2015 at Quail Hollow Resort in Painesville. Please join us for a weekend of Shabbat celebration, great food (all meals and snacks are included) and drinks (there is a bar on site, or BYOB to our hospitality suite), social time (there is an indoor pool), and learning experiences for all ages — you do not have to have children in the religious school to participate! Learning sessions will be led by Rabbi Jim, TBS faculty, and special guests. We will also be hosting a “world premiere” … stay tuned for more details!

For the Early-Bird registration rate (save $5 per person), please submit your form and payment by Sunday, November 23. For more information, please see the flyer and registration form below, or contact Stefani Carlson, Education Director, at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or 330-752-3349. We look forward to spending the weekend with you!

The book club had a great discussion of Dara Horn's "Guide for the Perplexed" on November 2. Thanks to Rebecca Egolf for facilitating and to Kim Strausser, Ed Weisman, Jean Beasley, and Mitch Fromm for their vibrant conversation. Special thanks to Simone Fromm for her delicious treats.

The book club's next selection will be "The Wanting", by Michael Lavigne. The discussion is tentatively set for February 1. The central themes of "The Wanting" span decades, countries and narrators and include extremism and terrorism in Israel, Soviet Jewry, and Jewish identity. It examines the Israeli-Palestinian conflict through the lens of a Palestinian suicide bomber and his family, and a family of Russian Jewish immigrants involved in a terror attack. Here's the New York Times review:

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/03/03/books/review/the-wanting-by-michael-lavigne.html

Rebecca Egolf will lead the discussion, and all readers are invited to participate.